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Editor's Review: Educational, Fun-to-Read Books by Hands-on-Prints
Written by Karen Logan   

I participated in an Influencer Activation on behalf of Influence Central for Hands-on-Prints books. I received books to facilitate my review.”

Reading is an activity that takes place in my home many (many) times throughout each day. My family loves books, so when I received an offer to review a couple of Hands-on-Prints books by Christinia Cheung,  I jumped at the opportunity. With a M.A. in Early Childhood Education, Cheung’s inspiration for writing a series of 5 books came after she established a Montessori school that celebrates the learning differences of each student. Her books – or at least the two I’ve read thusfar – are examples of Cheung’s passion for presenting educational ideas to children in new, inspirational ways.

A Persistent Vine” is one of the more original stories I’ve read this year. It gives a fictional account of a young girl and her parents who live on a lushly landscaped estate that eventually gets taken over by the morning glory plant. From the perfect pace of the enchanting tale to page after page of fascinating illustrations, this book shines brightly. Its tone is somewhat mysterious, and its perfect ending is one that stays with the reader for some time. My daughters, ages 9 and 7, read this book several times over, each time taking care to examine the remarkable illustrations. There is “newness” to encounter on every page: Japanese architecture, the introduction of various species of plants, beautifully dressed characters… We love delving into different cultures, and any enjoyable read that’s educational too is a win-win! This book does not disappoint, and it’s no wonder it was awarded the Silver Prize for the 2013 Moonbeam Children's Book Awards. 

Another Hands-On Prints book I enjoyed reading with my girls is “Do I Have To? What if I Don't Want To?"

(Oh, if I had a penny for every time I heard that question in my house!) This uniquely crafted book addresses the child who needs help understanding why he/she HAS to do certain things they’re told to do by their parents and the possible consequences involved with NOT doing that thing. In my house, my answer is always “Because I’m the boss, Applesauce!” but that doesn’t go over too well with a child who’s frustrated and is feeling misunderstood. Written in first-person point of view, “Do I Have to?” includes some model conversations and several mini-scenario book inserts that provide great response ideas for parents dealing with an uncooperative or frustrated child. The illustrations are very kid-friendly, and the book is fun to read and makes for good conversation / talking points with your little ones. 

If you're in the market for a couple of good reads, consider giving these two a try! 
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